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Bilderberg: Its Long and Secret History

American Free Press | May 19 2004

The roots of Bilderberg go back centuries, when international moneychangers would secretly manipulate the economy to enrich themselves and enslave ordinary people.

The Rothchilds of Britain and Europe have met secretly with other financiers for centuries, as did the Rockefellers of America.

In the beginning, the Rothchilds were "Red Shields" because of the ornament on their door and the Rockefellers of Germany were "Rye Fields" because of their crops.

One of the most significant such meetings took place in the spring of 1908, led by Sen. Nelson Aldrich Rockefeller's given name. It was held on Jekyll Island off the Georgia coast.

The late B.C Forbes, editor of Forbes magazine, reported what transpired at this meeting of the world's wealthy. With Aldrich were Henry Davidson, of J.P. Morgan and Co.' Frank Vanderlip, president of the National City Bank; Paul Warburg, of Kuhn Loeb and Co., and A. Piatt Andrew, assistant secretary of the treasury.

They emerged from this secret meeting with a plan for "a scientific currency system for the United States." They had the power to pressure Congress into establishing the Federal Reserve Board, a private group of bankers who meet to shape the money supply.

But in 1954, the international financiers decided that the world had become so small and their interests intersected so often, that they must have regular, annual meetings. That year they met at the Bilderberg Hotel in Holland, and took the name "Bilderberg" for themselves.

They have met behind sealed-off walls and armed guards at plush resorts ever since. Secrecy prevailed briefly, until the late journalist, Westbrook Peglet, exposed Bilderberg in 1957. However, Chatham House rules have remained in effect, whereby meeting are held privately and attendees are prohibited from talking on the record about what transpired.

Pegler devoted two of his nationally syndicated columns to Bilderberg in April 1957, although he did not know the group's name.

SOMETHING MYSTERIOUS GOING ON

Something very mysterious is going on when a strange assortment of 67 self-qualified, polyglot designers and arbiters of the economic and political fate of our western world go into a secret huddle on an island off Brunswick, Ga., and not a word gets into the popular press beyond a little, routine AP story," Pegler wrote.

Pegler reported that Ralph McGill, the late editor of The Atlanta Constitution and Arthur Hayes Sulzberget, publisher of The New York Times, had attended on their promise of secrecy. Since, the publisher and associate editor of The Washington Post, Donald Graham and Jimmy Lee Hoagland, respectively, have been regular participants. All network news channels have attended these meetings. All promise to abide by the rule of secrecy.

Bilderberg, which typically meets at a luxury resort near a small town - this year's meeting is in Stresa, a town in Italy of fewer than 5,000 population - provides a short "press release" to the local paper - preferably a weekly. It is designed to reassure natives as armed guards arrive, motorcades roar by, yachts dock and helicopters land, delivering unidentified people behind closed-off walls.

The "press release" is the same each year, only the site and dates are updated. It says individuals will meet privately to do nothing for three days. Otherwise, they try to impose a complete blackout.

The blackout is virtually complete in the United States. When giant newspapers and broadcast outlets say they do not want the word "Bilderberg" to appear, the pressure on Associated Press is obvious; they are the biggest customers, paying far more than a small-circulation local paper.

Small-city papers depend on AP for all out-of-town news, even for their state legislative coverage. They run hard to stay ahead of the city council and high school football team. Unless informed directly, they have no knowledge that Bilderberg exists.

While Bilderberg denies its meetings are significant, the record proves otherwise. The now defunct Spotlight wrote advance stories on the end of the Cold War, the downfall of Margaret Thatcher as prime minister of Britain and of President George Bush the Elder's breaking of his pledge to raise taxes based on what transpired among Bilderbergers.

More recently, while the mainstream media in 2002 was asserting that the invasion of Iraq would come by late summer or early fall, American Free Press reported that there would be no aggression until 2003. The war began in March 2003.

Learning what transpires at Bilderberg can provide a glimpse of what the future holds.